BUZZED @ Nexus Arts Café

Last July I moved to Manchester and am excited to now be presenting my first concert in the city in collaboration with the Berlin-based French hornist Samuel Stoll:

BUZZED
Saturday, 20 February 2016 @ Nexus Arts Cáfe
2 Dale Street, Manchester, M1 1JW [click for map]
Doors – 8:00pm / Concert – 8:30pm
FREE (£5 donation)

Samuel and I have been collaborating for the last year, sending back and forth recorded improvisations and other materials. This concert is a combination of our own repertoires and the piece that emerged out of our collaboration with each other. BUZZED will feature recently composed experimental music and performances for solo voice and french horn in which I’m turned into a still-life, Samuel displays feats of embouchuric dexterity and stamina, we both explore a sonic and aural study of laughter, and soon-to-be legacy media are barely brought to life with the nylon hairs of violin bows.

Program:

Event listing on Facebook

Studio Recording of ‘No sweeter sound than my own name’

Beavan Flanagan and I have been busy at work editing and mixing the audio from our recording session of No sweeter sound than my own name, and are excited to be able to finally share the result with everyone. Watch and listen to the video below and then read back through our reflections on the collaboration and development process to find out more about the work.

No sweeter sound than my own name (2015)
composed by Beavan Flanagan
performed by Michael Baldwin
videoed by Angela Guyton

Live Performance of ‘No sweeter sound than my own name’

Live performance as part of the WEISSLICH concert series at Hundred Years Gallery
Filming credit: Tom Hartford

It has been a long time since I’ve written an update on the collaborative project Beavan Flanagan and I set out on about five months ago. Since the last update No sweeter sound than my own name has undergone several changes. The score has been finished, we’ve repurposed a storage stool into a speaker cabinet, experimented with a makeshift bone-conduction swimming cap, and performed the piece across England. Performances have taken place in Coventry, Birmingham, London, and last night in Huddersfield at the inaugural HCMOFF – an unaffiliated fringe event to the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival (HCMF//). Continue reading

‘No sweeter sound than my own name’ – Reflections and Commentary on Reading Audio-Score Drafts

I have been working with Beavan Flanagan to develop a new vocal piece for me titled, no sweeter sound than my own name. Beavan and I are exploring the use of an audio score and along the way I have been writing a few reflections on the experience of ‘reading’ the score. A couple of weeks ago Beavan Flanagan and I met up again to try out an updated audio-score. What follows are my reflections on practicing the original audio-score and reading the updated audio-score. My reflections are accompanied by commentary from Beavan and a video excerpt of the run-throughs we did during our workshops. Continue reading

externalized traces – In Conversation with Charlie Sdraulig about ‘few’

After visiting Charlie in May, and documenting a realization of few, I asked Charlie if he would be interested in having a free-form conversation with me about the piece and our collaboration. In our conversation we discussed the context from which few emerged, strategies for devising realizations, performative idiosyncrasies, overhearing, the duration of the score and its relation to focus, re-sounding as a possible way of interpreting the work activated by the piece, and an idea of documentation as inviting mishearings.


IN CONVERSATION WITH CHARLIE SDRAULIG ABOUT FEW

Michael Baldwin: Let’s start by talking about the context in which few was written.

Charlie Sdraulig: few is the third piece in a series collectively known as breath. The other two pieces in the series were primarily concerned with developing a vocabulary of sounds for winds predicated on a tenuous physical relationship between a performer and their instrument. The idea for this third breath piece had been percolating for a while and I wasn’t entirely sure what form it would take. Actually, the piece started off quite grandiosely as this kind of epic for slide whistle! Continue reading